1 (edited by sarimanok Sep 24 2017 20:14:12)

Topic: DA to import Brangus embryos in 2018, letter to Sir Manny Pinol

The letter below has been posted at the facebook account of Sir Manny Pinol and has also been sent to the Department of Agriculture

Dear Sir Manny Pinol,

I am not a cattle raiser but have been reading about it.

Regarding the importation of Brangus embyos, perhaps a modification could be made. Before going into what the modification would be, below are some important information:

From: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new … Cattle.pdf
Genetic Basis for Heat Tolerance in Cattle March 2015
"Characteristics of individual animals can also position them at higher risk for heat stress. Hide color is a well-known risk factor because dark hair has lower reflectance values (da Silva et al. 2003) and dark skin absorbs a greater proportion of solar radiation (93% thermal absorption for black skin vs 43% for non-pigmented skin; da Silva et al. 2003). Predictably, animals with black hides spend significantly more time in the shade (89% for black hides and 55% for white; Gebremedhin et al. 2011). Dark-hided cattle are 25% more stressed at temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius when compared to light-hided cattle (Brown-Brandl et al. 2006) and exhibit 5.7x higher mortality risk in the feedlot (Hungerford et al. 2000)."

From: https://www.ars.usda.gov/plains-area/cl … skfactors/
USDA Cattle Heat Stress Risk Factors
"Color plays an important role in heat tolerance. Dark colors absorb more heat than light colors.  As a result, a black animal will be more susceptible to heat stress than a white or tan animal.
It has recently been shown that temperament also plays a small role in heat tolerance.  Animals that are calmer are more heat tolerant than animals that are more excitable."

Just recently, April 2017, the University of Florida introduced the White Angus they are developing.
"This week’s featured video highlights the White Angus breed of cattle being developed at the UF/IFAS Range Cattle Research and Education Center, in Ona, Florida.  These are not purebred Angus, but a line of cattle that are approximately 3/4 blood Angus that have dark skin but light colored hair coat.  When White Angus cows are bred to purebred black Angus the calves retain their light hair coat.  In the deep south, having the positive characteristics of Angus yet with white hair, actually more like light grey or silver, is a significant advantage, because the cattle stay cooler in the summer than black calves."
From http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/201 … f-florida/ In their video, titled: White Angus Revulution, it described the White Angus as a new heat resistant breed, genetically Black Angus with white hair, black hides and pigments.

Just like the Angus, the Brangus have black hides which makes them more susceptible to heat stress compared to lighter colored breeds. Instead of importing Brangus Embryos is there White Brangus available? There is no such breed yet.

As mentioned earlier, could a modification be made with the importation of the Brangus embryos? Instead of pure Brangus embryos i would suggest a cross bred. Since the White Brangus breed does not exist yet could the Philippines initiate this breeding project similar to what the University of Florida is doing with the White Angus?

To do the White Brangus project, the modification for the embryos is very simple, use semen from cattle breeds carrying the genetics for white hair and black skin. Two cattle breeds that have white hair and black skin are the Speckle Park and British White. If semen are not available in Argentina then they can be imported from the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand or elsewhere where they are available and sent to Argentina.

Surely this would be more expensive. To offset this, perhaps the number of embryos could be reduced but in return the country would be getting better and more diverse genetics. And hopefully some day the Philippines will be proud to have developed the White Brangus Cattle breed that is more heat resistant, more advantageous than the Black Brangus.

Father God Lord Jesus bless and guide the livestock projects being undertaken in the Philippines, and the people and agencies involved! Thank You YHWH Father God!

Kenneth S. Kennedy
Has a Biology degree from the University of Oregon. Developed the Pinoy Angelfish (freswater ornamental/aquarium fish) now recognized worldwide

2

Re: DA to import Brangus embryos in 2018, letter to Sir Manny Pinol

sarimanok wrote:

The letter below has been posted at the facebook account of Sir Manny Pinol and has also been sent to the Department of Agriculture

Dear Sir Manny Pinol,

I am not a cattle raiser but have been reading about it.

Regarding the importation of Brangus embyos, perhaps a modification could be made. Before going into what the modification would be, below are some important information:

From: http://www.cabpartners.com/articles/new … Cattle.pdf
Genetic Basis for Heat Tolerance in Cattle March 2015
"Characteristics of individual animals can also position them at higher risk for heat stress. Hide color is a well-known risk factor because dark hair has lower reflectance values (da Silva et al. 2003) and dark skin absorbs a greater proportion of solar radiation (93% thermal absorption for black skin vs 43% for non-pigmented skin; da Silva et al. 2003). Predictably, animals with black hides spend significantly more time in the shade (89% for black hides and 55% for white; Gebremedhin et al. 2011). Dark-hided cattle are 25% more stressed at temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius when compared to light-hided cattle (Brown-Brandl et al. 2006) and exhibit 5.7x higher mortality risk in the feedlot (Hungerford et al. 2000)."

From: https://www.ars.usda.gov/plains-area/cl … skfactors/
USDA Cattle Heat Stress Risk Factors
"Color plays an important role in heat tolerance. Dark colors absorb more heat than light colors.  As a result, a black animal will be more susceptible to heat stress than a white or tan animal.
It has recently been shown that temperament also plays a small role in heat tolerance.  Animals that are calmer are more heat tolerant than animals that are more excitable."

Just recently, April 2017, the University of Florida introduced the White Angus they are developing.
"This week’s featured video highlights the White Angus breed of cattle being developed at the UF/IFAS Range Cattle Research and Education Center, in Ona, Florida.  These are not purebred Angus, but a line of cattle that are approximately 3/4 blood Angus that have dark skin but light colored hair coat.  When White Angus cows are bred to purebred black Angus the calves retain their light hair coat.  In the deep south, having the positive characteristics of Angus yet with white hair, actually more like light grey or silver, is a significant advantage, because the cattle stay cooler in the summer than black calves."
From http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/201 … f-florida/ In their video, titled: White Angus Revulution, it described the White Angus as a new heat resistant breed, genetically Black Angus with white hair, black hides and pigments.

Just like the Angus, the Brangus have black hides which makes them more susceptible to heat stress compared to lighter colored breeds. Instead of importing Brangus Embryos is there White Brangus available? There is no such breed yet.

As mentioned earlier, could a modification be made with the importation of the Brangus embryos? Instead of pure Brangus embryos i would suggest a cross bred. Since the White Brangus breed does not exist yet could the Philippines initiate this breeding project similar to what the University of Florida is doing with the White Angus?

To do the White Brangus project, the modification for the embryos is very simple, use semen from cattle breeds carrying the genetics for white hair and black skin. Two cattle breeds that have white hair and black skin are the Speckle Park and British White. If semen are not available in Argentina then they can be imported from the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand or elsewhere where they are available and sent to Argentina.

Surely this would be more expensive. To offset this, perhaps the number of embryos could be reduced but in return the country would be getting better and more diverse genetics. And hopefully some day the Philippines will be proud to have developed the White Brangus Cattle breed that is more heat resistant, more advantageous than the Black Brangus.

Father God Lord Jesus bless and guide the livestock projects being undertaken in the Philippines, and the people and agencies involved! Thank You YHWH Father God!

Kenneth S. Kennedy
Has a Biology degree from the University of Oregon. Developed the Pinoy Angelfish (freswater ornamental/aquarium fish) now recognized worldwide

Thanks for the info, sir.