1 (edited by papito Feb 05 2010 02:27:03)

Re: About Coffee and Coffee Beans

Coffee Terms Illustrated

Coffee Plant Varieties
http://www.coffeeterms.com/coffea-plant-varieties.htm

Coffee Bean Classification and Grading
http://www.coffeeterms.com/coffee-bean-classification-and-grading.htm

Coffee Farming and Processing
http://www.coffeeterms.com/coffee-farming-and-processing.htm

Coffee Producing Countries
http://www.coffeeterms.com/coffee-producing-countries.htm

Coffee info from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee

Coffee is a brewed drink prepared from roasted seeds, commonly called coffee beans, of the coffee plant. They are seeds of coffee cherries that grow on trees in over 70 countries. Green (unroasted) coffee is one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world.[1] Due to its caffeine content, coffee can have a stimulating effect in humans. Today, coffee is one of the most popular beverages worldwide.[2]

It is thought that the energizing effect of the coffee bean plant was first recognized in Yemen in Arabia and the north east of Ethiopia, and the cultivation of coffee first expanded in the Arab world.[3] The earliest credible evidence of coffee drinking appears in the middle of the fifteenth century, in the Sufi monasteries of the Yemen in southern Arabia.[3] From the Muslim world, coffee spread to Italy, then to the rest of Europe, to Indonesia, and to the Americas.[4] Coffee has played an important role in many societies throughout history. In Africa and Yemen, it was used in religious ceremonies. As a result, the Ethiopian Church banned its secular consumption until the reign of Emperor Menelik II of Ethiopia.[5] It was banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons,[6] and was associated with rebellious political activities in Europe.

Coffee berries, which contain the coffee bean, are produced by several species of small evergreen bush of the genus Coffea. The two most commonly grown are the highly regarded Coffea arabica, and the 'robusta' form of the hardier Coffea canephora. The latter is resistant to the devastating coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix). Both are cultivated primarily in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. The seeds are then roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor. They are then ground and brewed to create coffee. Coffee can be prepared and presented in a variety of ways.

Contents

    * 1 Etymology
    * 2 Biology
    * 3 Cultivation
          o 3.1 Production
          o 3.2 Ecological effects
    * 4 Processing
          o 4.1 Roasting
          o 4.2 Storage
          o 4.3 Preparation
          o 4.4 Presentation
    * 5 Sale and distribution
          o 5.1 As a commodity
          o 5.2 Fair trade
    * 6 Health and pharmacology
    * 7 History
    * 8 Social and cultural aspects
          o 8.1 Coffeehouses
          o 8.2 Religious prohibition
          o 8.3 Folklore
    * 9 Notes
          o 9.1 References
    * 10 External links

Of the Top twenty green coffee producers — Tonnes (2007) and Bags thousands (2007), the Philippines was number 14.

A new patented method of growing coffee [Arabica] using trellises was introduced in 1994 by
Dr. J. Alban, of California.  Kona Joe Estate-Grown Trellised Coffee is produced by growing the coffee trees on trellises just like grapevines.  See info at http://www.konajoe.com/about.html

The most expensive coffee beans is the Kopi Luwak from Indonesia.  Some articles estimate the price at between $100 to $600 per pound, the average is about $300/lb. Kopi Luwak info at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kopi_Luwak

Kopi Luwak (pronounced [ˈkopi 'luak]) or Civet coffee is coffee made from coffee berries which have been eaten by and passed through the digestive tract of the Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and other related civets. The civets eat the berries, but the beans inside pass through their system undigested. This process takes place on the islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali and Sulawesi in the Indonesian Archipelago, in the Philippines (where the product is called Motit Coffee in the Cordillera, or Kape Alamid in Tagalog areas) and in East Timor (locally called kafé-laku). Local lore in Vietnam has given the name "weasel coffee" to civet coffee, in what is considered the closest recognizable translation to English.

"Let justice roll down like waters
and righteousness like an everlasting stream".
Amos

2

Re: About Coffee and Coffee Beans

I drink coffee day and night. My favorite is Organic Peruvian and Dark Roast. There are so many coffees out there and I like sampling each one when I come across new ones. I'm not a flavored coffee drinker.

3

Re: About Coffee and Coffee Beans

I like tea more... Want a cuppa?

4 (edited by shiroanubis Feb 25 2012 10:38:32)

Re: About Coffee and Coffee Beans

Hi, I was looking for coffee in G ** gle and I found this thread. I would like to ask what the best way to store coffee, so the taste and quality will not be reduced even if we save it for the long term?

larry.lapitan wrote:

shiroanubis

The best way to store coffee is to check its moisture content of 11-13% using the moisture meter.  Use jute sack and store in a well ventilated room using pallet.  For more information, please communicate with Dr. Alejandro C. Mojica of the Cavite State University with email address:andro_mojica@yahoo.com

Fely Bautista
Commodity Specialist for coffee
Crops Research Division

Thank you very much, it's really useful tips and info. I really appreciate it  smile

5

Re: About Coffee and Coffee Beans

shiroanubis

The best way to store coffee is to check its moisture content of 11-13% using the moisture meter.  Use jute sack and store in a well ventilated room using pallet.  For more information, please communicate with Dr. Alejandro C. Mojica of the Cavite State University with email address:andro_mojica@yahoo.com

Fely Bautista
Commodity Specialist for coffee
Crops Research Division